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Account Safety
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Learn the basics of creating online accounts, including creating secure passwords and keeping accounts secure.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Activism in the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Ads in Search Results
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Never used a search engine before? This class will help you learn about search engines and get you starting searching the internet. We will also cover some advanced search tools and advertisements in search.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Aging Heart Valves
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this unit, students learn about the form and function of the human heart through lecture, research and dissection. Following the steps of the Legacy Cycle, students brainstorm, research, design and present viable solutions to various heart conditions as presented through a unit challenge. Additionally, students study how heart valves work and investigate how faulty valves can be replaced with new ones through advancements in engineering and technology. This unit demonstrates to students how and why the heart is such a powerful organ in our bodies

Subject:
Education
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Carleigh Samson
Date Added:
09/18/2014
America during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

In the spring of 1918, the United States was embroiled in World War I, fighting alongside the English, French, and Russians against the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary. In total, 70 million men were at war on multiple fronts across Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa. The tide was finally turning for the Allies after a crushing offensive by German forces mere weeks earlier. Then, a fierce enemy intervened—an outbreak of influenza that would decimate entire regiments and towns, kill civilians and soldiers alike by the millions, and rapidly become a global pandemic. This disease weakened forces on both sides, changing not only the course of the war but also the economies and population stability of every affected nation. In the long term, this particular outbreak would inspire research on an unprecedented scale and lead to advances in science and medicine, forever altering our understanding of epidemiology. From the spring of 1918 to early 1919, no aspect of life remained untouched by the pandemic for Americans at home and on the front. This exhibition explores the pandemic’s impact on American life.  This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin's course "Metadata in Theory and Practice" in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University: Bethany Campbell, Michelle John, Samantha Reid-Goldberg, Anne Sexton, and John Weimer.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Anne Sexton
Bethany Campbell
John Weimer
Michelle John
Samantha Reid-Goldberg
Date Added:
04/01/2015
American Aviatrixes: Women with Wings
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Throughout the early twentieth century, women looked to break new ground in ways never before possible, and the sky literally became the limit. As the nation moved into the aviation age, many women saw flying as a way to break out of traditional societal roles. It gave women not just an opportunity for adventure and excitement, but a way to earn a living outside of the home that demanded respect. Aviatrix Ruth Bancroft Law described it, after defeating the cross-country distance record: "There is an indescribable feeling which one experiences in flying; it comes with no other form of sport or navigation. It takes courage and daring; one must be self-possessed, for there are moments when one's wits are tested to the full. Yet there is an exhilaration that compensates for all one's efforts." In this exhibition we explore the early history of aviation and the courageous women who took to the skies—aviatrixes who found freedom, broke new ground, and inspired generations of women along the way. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Debbie Rabina’s course "Information Services and Sources" in the School of Information and Library Science at Pratt Institute: Megan DeArmond, Diana Moronta, Laurin Paradise.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Diana Moronta
Megan DeArmond
Date Added:
03/01/2015
America's Great Depression and Roosevelt's New Deal
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The stock market crash on October 29, 1929 -- known as Black Tuesday -- was the "worst economic collapse in the history of the modern industrial world." It spread from the United States to national economies across the globe. It ended a decade known for its high-spirited free-spending, called the Roaring 20s, and began almost 10 years of financial desperation that would touch nearly every citizen of the United States. The Great Depression caused bank closures and business failures and by its end, saw "more than 15 million Americans (one-quarter of the workforce)" unemployed. Herbert Hoover, president at the time, did not acknowledge the depth of the crisis and assumed that the American characteristics of individualism and self reliance would quickly bring the nation out of the disaster without a need for federal intervention. But, layoffs and financial desperation at the personal level were growing: "an empty pocket turned inside out was called a 'Hoover flag' [and] the decrepit shanty towns springing up around the country were called 'Hoovervilles'." Three years into the financial crisis, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, running on a platform of federal recovery programs called the "New Deal," easily took the presidential election of 1932.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Amy Rudersdorf
Emily Gore
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Android Acceleration Application
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Educational Use
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In the first of two sequential lessons, students create mobile apps that collect data from an Android device's accelerometer and then store that data to a database. This lesson provides practice with MIT's App Inventor software and culminates with students writing their own apps for measuring acceleration. In the second lesson, students are given an app for an Android device, which measures acceleration. They investigate acceleration by collecting acceleration vs. time data using the accelerometer of a sliding Android device. Then they use the data to create velocity vs. time graphs and approximate the maximum velocity of the device.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Sandall
Scott Burns
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Autoclave Operation
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In this interactive lesson, we'll cover an overview of the autoclave, review safety considerations and you will get the opportunity to run a batch cycle with the autoclave machine.

Subject:
Allied health personnel
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Avoiding Scams
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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In this class, get an overview of looking for a job online. We cover online classified sites, job search sites, company sites, and staying safe from scams.

Subject:
Internet
CTE
Occupations
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Basic Search
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Never used a search engine before? This class will help you learn about search engines and get you starting searching the internet. We will also cover some advanced search tools and advertisements in search.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Basic Search - Review
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Never used a search engine before? This class will help you learn about search engines and get you starting searching the internet. We will also cover some advanced search tools and advertisements in search.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Best Foot Forward: The Shoe Industry in Massachusetts
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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It was approximately 40,000 years ago that mankind first donned a pair of shoes. During humanity’s long history of footwear, and an equally broad array of styles, the basic fundamentals of Western shoemaking remained mostly unchanged until the mid-nineteenth century. In the 1800s, the small state of Massachusetts revolutionized the shoemaking industry, cladding the feet of consumers nationwide in unprecedented numbers. One of America’s original colonies, Massachusetts found itself at the heart of the nation’s shoemaking industry by attracting and retaining skilled shoemakers and shoe machinery engineers. Only when the technology that Massachusetts' shoemakers invented became available beyond the state did the industry’s market expand throughout the country. Even with the spread of industrialization, Massachusetts remained the largest producer of shoes in the United States through World War I, responsible for nearly forty percent of America’s shoes and home to an equal percentage of its shoemakers. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Public Library Partnerships Project by collaborators from Digital Commonwealth. Exhibition organizer: Anna Fahey-Flynn.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Anna Fahey-Flynn
Date Added:
09/01/2015
Bone Mineral Density and Logarithms
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Educational Use
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Students examine an image produced by a cabinet x-ray system to determine if it is a quality bone mineral density image. They write in their journals about what they need to know to be able to make this judgment. Students learn about what bone mineral density is, how a BMD image can be obtained, and how it is related to the x-ray field. Students examine the process used to obtain a BMD image and how this process is related to mathematics, primarily through logarithmic functions. They study the relationship between logarithms and exponents, the properties of logarithms, common and natural logarithms, solving exponential equations and Beer's law.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Kristyn Shaffer
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Boom and Bust: The Industries That Settled Montana
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CC BY
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In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory—800,000 square miles of land in the interior of North America. Most of this land had not been previously explored or documented. President Thomas Jefferson chose Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to lead an ambitious military expedition, seeking a northwestern passage to the Pacific Ocean and to document their journey in this unknown territory. Starting in what is now Missouri, the expedition followed the Missouri River and passed through present-day Montana on its way to the Pacific. The explorers commented on the beauty of the landscape and the abundance of animals, and their descriptions attracted fur traders and others ready to take advantage of the region's abundant natural resources. The discovery of gold in 1862 brought in the first rush of people and subsequent mining forever changed the region. The mining industry demanded support in the form of towns, railroads, logging, ranching, and farming. These industries shaped Montana and the people who settled there. This exhibition explores the industries that brought settlers to Montana from the early days to the 1920s. Each industry had its own “boom and bust” cycle that impacted the residents and the future of the state. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Public Library Partnerships Project by collaborators from Montana Memory Project: Jennifer Birnel, Della Yeager, Cody Allen, Dale Alger, Caroline Campbell, Carly Delsigne, Pam Henley, Stef Johnson, Lisa Mecklenberg-Jackson, Laura Tretter, and Franky Abbott. Exhibition organizers: Jennifer Birnel and Franky Abbott.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Franky Abbot
Jennifer Birnell
Date Added:
09/01/2015
The Boston Sports Temples
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Boston Sports Temples celebrates the rich histories of Boston’s professional stadiums and arenas. Some, like Fenway Park, still welcome fans today. Others were demolished decades ago, leaving only hints of their former glory amid the urban landscape. This exhibition welcomes modern fans through the gates of venues both famous and forgotten: the various home fields—and courts and tracks and ice—of Boston’s most beloved franchises and hosts to a century of public events, concerts, and gatherings. Featuring historical photographs from the Boston Public Library’s extensive archives, Boston Sports Temples draws from thousands of negatives and prints dating from the early twentieth century through the 1960s. The images capture the unique character of Boston’s historic sports venues, memorable moments, and the communities of athletes, fans, and staff who have come together within their walls. Together, these vintage materials provide an invaluable window into the past and a nostalgic look back at our city, our deep sporting traditions, and generations of passionate fandom. Created by the Boston Public Library.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Bread and Roses Strike of 1912: Two Months in Lawrence, Massachusetts, that Changed Labor History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The Lawrence Textile Strike was a public protest mainly of immigrant workers from several countries, including Austria, Belgium, Cuba, Canada, France, England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Spain, Syria, and Turkey. According to the 1910 census, 65% of mill workers (many of whom eventually struck) lived in the United States for less than 10 years; 47% for less than five years. Prompted by a wage cut, the walkout spread quickly from mill to mill across the city. Strikers defied the assumptions of conservative trade unions within the American Federation of Labor that immigrant, largely female and ethnically diverse workers could not be organized. The Lawrence strike is referred to as the “Bread and Roses” strike and “The Strike for Three Loaves." The first known source to do so was a 1916 labor anthology, The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest by Upton Sinclair. Prior to that, the slogan, used as the title of a 1911 poem by James Oppenheim, had been attributed to ‘Chicago Women Trade Unionists.’ It has also been attributed to socialist union organizer Rose Schneiderman. James Oppenheim claimed his seeing women strikers in Lawrence carrying a banner proclaiming “We Want Bread and Roses Too” inspired the poem, “Bread and Roses.” The poem, however, was written and published in 1911 prior to the strike. Later the poem was set to music by Caroline Kohlsaat and then by Mimi Farina. The song and slogan are now important parts of the labor movement and women’s movement worldwide. This exhibition was made in collaboration with the Lawrence History Center and the University of Massachusetts Lowell History Department.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Building the First Transcontinental Railroad
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

As the United States began the most deadly conflict in its history, the American Civil War, it was also laying the groundwork for one of its greatest achievements in transportation. The First Transcontinental Railroad, approved by Congress in the midst of war, helped connect the country in ways never before possible. Americans could travel from coast to coast with speed, changing how Americans lived, traded, and communicated while disrupting ways of life practiced for centuries by Native American populations. The coast-to-coast railroad was the result of the work of thousands of Americans, many of whom were Chinese immigrant laborers who worked under discriminatory pressures and for lower wages than their Irish counterparts. These laborers braved incredibly harsh conditions to lay thousands of miles of track. That track—the work of two railroad companies competing to lay the most miles from opposite directions—came together with the famous Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in Utah on May 10, 1869. This exhibition explores the construction of the first Transcontinental Railroad and its impact on American westward expansion. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Krystyna Matusiak's course "Digital Libraries" in the Library and Information Science program at the University of Denver: Jenifer Fisher, Benjamin Hall, Nick Iwanicki, Cheyenne Jansdatter, Sarah McDonnell, Timothy Morris and Allan Van Hoye.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Allan Van Hoye
Benjamin Hall
Cheyenne Jansdatter
Jenifer Fisher
Nick Iwanicki
Sarah McDonnell
Timothy Morris
Date Added:
05/01/2015
CC & BCC
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

After you have mastered the basics, learn how to do more with your email account.

Subject:
CTE
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Career Sites
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this class, get an overview of looking for a job online. We cover online classified sites, job search sites, company sites, and staying safe from scams.

Subject:
Internet
CTE
Occupations
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Centrifugation
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0.0 stars

This module includes, the basics of centrifugation, effects of gravity on particles in suspension, operation of a centrifuge, differential centrifugation, basic components, hazards and safety.

Subject:
Allied health personnel
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Children in Progressive-Era America
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

In twenty-first century American society, childhood is popularly understood as a time of innocence, learning, and play. At the end of the nineteenth century, however, children made up part of the country’s workforce, and labored on farms and in factories. When they were not working, they enjoyed great independence in leisure activities—be it in a loud city street or a peaceful country lake. Often, children were far from adult supervision. Reformers during the Progressive Er—a period of social activism and political reform across the United States between the 1890s and 1920s —took a great interest in child welfare. Through organizations and legislation, they sought to define what a happy and healthy childhood should be in the modern age. Immersion in nature was central to what the Progressives prescribed, and children’s organizations and camps offered a suitable combination of supervision and open spaces. The formula for a healthy childhood was further refined in postwar America. Children were given a distinct place in the family and home, as well as within the consumer market with the emergence of teenage culture and buying power. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA's Public Library Partnerships Project by collaborators from the Digital Library of Georgia and Georgia's public libraries.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Greer Martin
Date Added:
09/01/2015
Chromatography
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0.0 stars

This module includes, basics of Chromatography, affinity, ion exchange, size exclusion, part and functions associated with chromatography.

Subject:
Allied health personnel
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Clean Up This Mess
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Students are challenged to design a method for separating steel from aluminum based on magnetic properties as is frequently done in recycling operations. To complicate the challenge, the magnet used to separate the steel must be able to be switched off to allow for the recollection of the steel. Students must ultimately design, test, and present an effective electromagnet.

Subject:
Ecology
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Justin Montenegro
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Company Sites
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this class, get an overview of looking for a job online. We cover online classified sites, job search sites, company sites, and staying safe from scams.

Subject:
Internet
CTE
Occupations
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Computers Are Not for Me
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Do you ever wonder why you should take the time and effort to learn to use a computer? If you are new to using computers you may think that it is too hard, too expensive, or not for people like you. You are not alone. Take this course to learn why using a computer can be worth the time and effort, and to take a closer look at what steps you can take to learn computers one skill at a time.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information systems management
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Creating a New Account
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn the basics of creating online accounts, including creating secure passwords and keeping accounts secure.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Creative Engineering Design
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Educational Use
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Students are introduced to the world of creative engineering product design. Through six activities, teams work through the steps of the engineering design process (or loop) by completing an actual design challenge presented in six steps. The project challenge is left up to the teacher or class to determine; it might be one decided by the teacher, brainstormed with the class, or the example provided (to design a prosthetic arm that can perform a mechanical function). As students begin by defining the problem, they learn to recognize the need, identify a target population, relate to the project, and identify its requirements and constraints. Then they conduct research, brainstorm alternative solutions, evaluate possible solutions, create and test prototypes, and consider issues for manufacturing. See the Unit Schedule section for a list of example design project topics.

Subject:
Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
See individual activities.
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Data Quality: Out of Range Values
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Defines what "Out of Range Values" are and how to account for them in data collection and statistical analysis.

Subject:
Health and Medical Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
University of Michigan
Provider Set:
open.Michigan African Health OER Network
Author:
Beverly Musick
Date Added:
01/13/2021
Determining Glassware Accuracy
Rating
0.0 stars

What are the differences between graduated cylinders, beakers, and Erlenmeyer flasks? Practice measuring volumes and determine percent error and standard deviation for each piece of lab glassware.

Subject:
Allied health personnel
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Digital Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Geographic information systems (GIS), once used predominantly by experts in cartography and computer programming, have become pervasive in everyday business and consumer use. This unit explores GIS in general as a technology about which much more can be learned, and it also explores applications of that technology. Students experience GIS technology through the use of Google Earth on the environmental topic of plastics in the ocean in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The use of this topic in GIS makes the unit multidisciplinary, incorporating the physics of ocean currents, the chemistry associated with pollutant degradation and chemical sorption to organic-rich plastics, and ecological impact to aquatic biota.

Subject:
Engineering
Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Downloading Skype
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn the basics of Skype in this class, including signing up, adding contacts, and making a video call.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Dropbox
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn what cloud storage is, who offers it, and how to use it in this class.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Engineering Nature: DNA Visualization and Manipulation
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Educational Use
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Students are introduced to genetic techniques such as DNA electrophoresis and imaging technologies used for molecular and DNA structure visualization. In the field of molecular biology and genetics, biomedical engineering plays an increasing role in the development of new medical treatments and discoveries. Engineering applications of nanotechnology such as lab-on-a-chip and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microarrays are used to study the human genome and decode the complex interactions involved in genetic processes.

Subject:
Genetics
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mircea Ionescu
Myla Van Duyn
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Engineering Out of Harry Situations: The Science Behind Harry Potter
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Under the "The Science Behind Harry Potter" theme, a succession of diverse complex scientific topics are presented to students through direct immersive interaction. Student interest is piqued by the incorporation of popular culture into the classroom via a series of interactive, hands-on Harry Potter/movie-themed lessons and activities. They learn about the basics of acid/base chemistry (invisible ink), genetics and trait prediction (parseltongue trait in families), and force and projectile motion (motion of the thrown remembrall). In each lesson and activity, students are also made aware of the engineering connections to these fields of scientific study.

Subject:
Genetics
Engineering
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Christine Hawthorne
Rachel Howser
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Environmental Engineering and Water Chemistry
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Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students are introduced to the fundamentals of environmental engineering as well as the global air, land and water quality concerns facing today's environmental engineers. After a lesson and activity to introduce environmental engineering, students learn more about water chemistry aspects of environmental engineering. Specifically, they focus on groundwater contamination and remediation, including sources of contamination, adverse health effects of contaminated drinking water, and current and new remediation techniques. Several lab activities provide hands-on experiences with topics relevant to environmental engineering concerns and technologies, including removal efficiencies of activated carbon in water filtration, measuring pH, chromatography as a physical separation method, density and miscibility.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Barry Williams
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Environmental Monitoring
Rating
0.0 stars

Environmental Monitoring is a challenging and serious game which places you in a virtual cleanroom, tasked with performing typical personnel, surface, non-viable, and viable particle counting activities.

Subject:
Allied health personnel
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
09/11/2018
Exploring Skype
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn the basics of Skype in this class, including signing up, adding contacts, and making a video call.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Feel Better Faster: All about Flow Rate
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Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

All of us have felt sick at some point in our lives. Many times, we find ourselves asking, "What is the quickest way that I can start to feel better?" During this two-lesson unit, students study that question and determine which form of medicine delivery (pill, liquid, injection/shot) offers the fastest relief. This challenge question serves as a real-world context for learning all about flow rates. Students study how long various prescription methods take to introduce chemicals into our blood streams, as well as use flow rate to determine how increasing a person's heart rate can theoretically make medicines work more quickly. Students are introduced to engineering devices that simulate what occurs during the distribution of antibiotic cells in the body.

Subject:
Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Michelle Woods
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Files and Folders (Win 10)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

If you know a bit about using a mouse and keyboard but don't know your way around using a computer just yet, this is the class for you. Learn how to use a PC (Personal Computer) with the Windows 10 Operating System.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information systems management
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Files and Folders - (Win 7)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

If you know a bit about using a mouse and keyboard but don't know your way around using a computer just yet, this is the class for you. Learn how to use a PC (Personal Computer) with the Windows 7 Operating System.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information systems management
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
Floaters and Sinkers
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students are introduced to the important concept of density with a focus is on the more easily understood densities of solids. Students use different methods to determine the densities of solid objects, including water displacement to determine volumes of irregularly-shaped objects. By comparing densities of various solids to the density of water, and by considering the behavior of different solids when placed in water, students conclude that ordinarily, objects with densities greater than water sink, while those with densities less than water float. Then they explore the principle of buoyancy, and through further experimentation arrive at Archimedes' principle that a floating object displaces a mass of water equal to its own mass. Students may be surprised to discover that a floating object displaces more water than a sinking object of the same volume.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Friends
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

Learn the basics of Facebook in this class, including signing up, finding friends, posting, and privacy.

Subject:
Internet
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Learn
Date Added:
04/04/2017
From Colonialism to Tourism: Maps in American Culture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

From the earliest days of settlement and migration, the people of North America have relied on maps and mapping to understand their environment and place within it. Maps have helped Americans prospect investments, comprehend war, and plan leisure in places unknown. As Americans have used maps to explore the U.S., capitalize on its resources, and displace its Native peoples, maps have shaped American cultural ideas about travel, place, and ownership. This exhibit explores the cultural and historic impact of mapping through four specific moments in American history: migration along the Oregon Trail, the rise of the lumber industry, the Civil War, and the popularization of the automobile and individual tourism. It concludes with a look at maps in the age of computers, the Internet, and beyond. These moments demonstrate the influence maps have had over how Americans imagine, exploit, and interact with national geographies and local places. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students in Professor Helene Williams's capstone course at the Information School at the University of Washington: Greg Bem, Kili Bergau, Emily Felt, and Jessica Blanchard. Additional revisions and selections made by Greg Bem.

Subject:
United States history
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Emily Felt
Greg Bem
Jessica Blanchard
Kili Bergau
Date Added:
09/01/2014